From the Journals

Radiation offers no survival benefit in early lung cancer with positive margins

 

Key clinical point: Additional radiation therapy was not associated with a long-term survival benefit in patients with early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer who had positive margins following lobectomy.

Major finding: There was no significant difference in likelihood of death associated with radiation treatment (hazard ratio, 1.10, 95% CI, 0.90-1.35).

Study details: A retrospective analysis of data in the National Cancer Data Base including 49,563 patients with stage I-II NSCLC who received lobectomy with no induction therapy between 1998 and 2006.

Disclosures: One study author reported serving as a consultant for Scanlan, and the rest had no disclosures.

Source: Gulack et al. J Surg Res. 2018 Mar. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2017.10.025.


 

FROM THE JOURNAL OF SURGICAL RESEARCH

For patients with early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had positive margins following lobectomy, additional radiation therapy was not associated with a long-term survival benefit in a recent retrospective study.

Positive margins were associated with significantly worse 5-year survival in the study of patients with stage I-II NSCLC, which was published in the Journal of Surgical Research (2018 Mar. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2017.10.025).

The study is one of the latest to suggest radiation may not be of benefit for treatment of positive margins after surgical resection of lung cancer, according to Brian C. Gulack, MD, MHS, department of surgery, Duke University, Durham, N.C., and his coauthors.

“Our analysis adds important findings to the literature as it focuses specifically on patients undergoing a lobectomy for stage I or II disease,” they wrote.

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