Commentary

Letters to the Editor: Avoid uterine vessels when injecting vasopressin


 

“DO YOU UTILIZE VASOPRESSIN IN YOUR DIFFICULT CESAREAN DELIVERY SURGERIES?”

ROBERT L. BARBIERI, MD (EDITORIAL; NOVEMBER 2016)


Avoid uterine vessels when injecting vasopressin

Thank you for your recent editorial discussing using vasopressin in difficult cesarean deliveries. I am very interested in using vasopressin for our placenta previa cases.

I reviewed the Kato et al article that Dr. Barbieri referenced, and the authors note a risk of injecting vasopressin into a vessel. 1 If you are injecting into the placental bed, how can you confirm you are not in a vessel? (When you withdraw, you will get some blood regardless.)

Sara Garmel, MD
Dearborn, Michigan

REFERENCE

  1. Kato S, Tanabe A, Kanki K, et al. Local injection of vasopressin reduces the blood loss during cesarean section in placenta previa. J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2014;40(5):1249–1256.

Dr. Barbieri responds

I agree with Dr. Garmel that we should avoid the intravascular injection of vasopressin. As I noted in the editorial, “I prefer to inject vasopressin in the subserosa of the uterus rather than inject it in a highly vascular area such as the subendometrium or near the uterine artery and vein.” Subserosal injection creates a depot bleb of vasopressin that is absorbed over a few minutes. You can visualize the reduced blood flow to the uterus following vasopressin injection because the uterus blanches and the diameter of the uterine vessels decreases significantly.

Share your thoughts! Send your Letter to the Editor to rbarbieri@frontlinemedcom.com. Please include your name and the city and state in which you practice.

Next Article:

   Comments ()

Recommended for You

Reviews and Expert Commentary

Quizzes from MD-IQ

Research Summaries from ClinicalEdge