Practice Alert

A look at new guidelines for HIV treatment and prevention

Start antiretroviral therapy as soon as possible after HIV infection is confirmed. Consider daily PrEP for patients at risk from sexual exposure or who inject illicit drugs.


 

References

An International Antiviral Society-USA Panel recently published an updated set of recommendations on using antiviral drugs to treat and prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection1—a rapidly changing and complex topic. This new guideline updates the society’s 2016 publication.2 It contains recommendations on when to start antiretroviral therapy for those who are HIV positive and advice on suitable combinations of antiretroviral drugs. It also details pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis strategies for preventing HIV infection in those at risk.

This Practice Alert highlights the most important recommendations on treating those newly diagnosed as HIV positive and on preventing infection. Physicians who provide care for those who are HIV positive should familiarize themselves with the entire guideline.

Initiating treatment in those newly diagnosed as HIV positive

The panel now recommends starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) as soon as possible after HIV infection is confirmed; immediately if a patient is ready to commit to starting and continuing treatment. Any patient with an opportunistic infection should begin ART within 2 weeks of its diagnosis. Patients being treated for tuberculosis (TB) should begin ART within 2 weeks of starting TB treatment if their CD4 cell count is <50/mcL; those whose count is 50/mcL should begin ART within 2 to 8 weeks.

The panel recommends one of 3 ART combinations (TABLE 11), all of which contain an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI). ART started immediately should not include a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) because of possible viral resistance. The guideline recommends 6 other ART combinations if none of the first 3 options can be used.1

Recommended regimens for initial antiretroviral therapy

An initial set of laboratory tests (TABLE 21) should be conducted on each individual receiving ART, although treatment can start before the results are returned. Ongoing laboratory monitoring, described in detail in the guideline, depends on the ART regimen chosen and the patient’s response to therapy. The only routinely recommended prophylaxis for opportunistic infections is for Pneumocystis pneumonia if the CD4 count is <200/mcL.

Recommended laboratory testing at the time of HIV diagnosis

Preventing HIV with prEP

Consider prescribing daily pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) with emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Truvada) for men and women who are at risk from sexual exposure to HIV or who inject illicit drugs. It takes about 1 week for protective tissue levels to be achieved. Testing to rule out HIV infection is recommended before starting PrEP, as is testing for serum creatinine level, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate is not recommended for those with creatinine clearance of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. For patients taking PrEP, emphasize other preventive measures such as using condoms to protect against both HIV and other sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs), using clean needles and syringes when injecting drugs, or entering a drug rehabilitation program. After initiating PrEP, schedule the first follow-up visit for 30 days later to repeat the HIV test and to assess adverse reactions and PrEP adherence.

Consider prescribing daily pre-exposure prophylaxis for men and women at risk from sexual exposure to HIV or who inject illicit drugs.

For men who have sex with men (MSM), there is an alternative form of PrEP when sexual exposure is infrequent. “On-demand” or “event-driven” PrEP involves 4 doses of emtricitabine/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate; 2 doses given with food 2 to 24 hours before sex (the closer to 24 the better), one dose 24 hours after the first and one 24 hours after the second. This is referred to as 2-1-1 dosing. This option has only been tested in MSM with sexual exposure. It is not recommended at this time for others at risk for HIV or for MSM with chronic or active hepatitis B infection.

Continue to: Preventing HIV infection with post-exposure prophylaxis

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