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ACOG, ACP voice ‘deep concern’ over potential Title X changes


 

The American College of Physicians and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists expressed concern over possible significant changes to Title X, a long-standing federal program that provides gynecologic care and family planning information and services, primarily to low-income and uninsured Americans.

“An announcement is expected any day that the Trump administration is going to make dramatic changes to Title X funding,” said Shari M. Erickson, vice president of governmental affairs and medical practice at the American College of Physicians, during a joint telebriefing May 4.

Shari M. Erickson

Shari M. Erickson

“The American College of Physicians is strongly opposed to any changes that would make it more difficult for patients seeking contraception and reproductive health services to find care,” said Ms. Erickson.

Hal Lawrence, MD, executive vice president and chief executive officer of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, echoed ACP’s concerns.

“When we talk about changes to limit or restructure Title X, we’re talking about changes to basic family planning options for American women,” he said during the telebriefing.

“As the largest organization of women’s health care providers, ACOG is deeply concerned about anticipated changes to Title X to limit the services that qualify for program funding and picking and choosing among qualified providers. These changes move away from science-based principles,” Dr. Lawrence said.

Dr. Hal Lawrence

Dr. Hal Lawrence

Dr. Lawrence noted that 99% of American women who have been sexually active report having used contraception at some point, and 87.5% have used a highly effective reversible method. “Contraceptive coverage is cost effective and reduces unintended pregnancies and abortion rates,” said Dr. Lawrence. “No doubt, the increased access to contraceptives facilitated by Title X programs has aided in bringing the American teenage pregnancy rate to an all-time low.”

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