From the Journals

Smoking increases heart failure risk in blacks

 

Key clinical point: Blacks who smoke cigarettes or who have a significant smoking history may be at increased risk of heart failure. Major finding: Current smoking, cigarettes per day, and smoking burden in pack-years were all independently associated with incident heart failure hospitalization (hazard ratio 2.82, 3.48, and 2.06, respectively) even after adjusting for risk factors and coronary heart disease.

Study details: Analysis of 4,129 participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a large, prospective, community-based observational study investigating cardiovascular risk factors in blacks.

Disclosures: Authors reported that they had no conflicts of interest related to the study. The Jackson Heart Study is supported by Jackson (Miss.) State University; Tougaloo College, and the University of Mississippi Medical Center, all in Jackson, contracts from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities. This study was supported by the NHLBI. One author has received support from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Source: Kamimura D et al. Circulation. 2018. doi: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.117.031912.


 

FROM CIRCULATION

Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for heart failure in blacks, according to results of an investigation of patients in the Jackson Heart Study.

Current smoking among blacks was associated with higher mean left ventricular (LV) mass and lower mean LV systolic function, even after adjustment for confounding factors, authors of the analysis reported in the journal Circulation.

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Smoking elderly man

Hospitalization for heart failure among blacks was associated not only with current smoking but also with smoking intensity, measured in cigarettes per day, and smoking burden, measured in pack-years, reported Daisuke Kamimura, MD, PhD, of the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, and associates.

While blacks are known to have a higher incidence of heart failure than do whites, Hispanics, and Asians, this is believed to be the first prospective study of a large black cohort demonstrating a dose-response relationship between smoking and incident heart failure.

“Smoking cessation may be a potential strategy to attenuate the higher rate of heart failure in blacks,” wrote Dr. Kamimura and coauthors.

The published analysis included data on 4,129 participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a large, prospective, community-based observational study investigating cardiovascular risk factors in blacks.

That group, which was 63% female, included 503 current smokers, 742 former smokers, and 2,884 individuals who had never smoked.

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