Commentary

Letters to the Editor: Determining fetal demise; SERMS in menopause; Aspirin for preeclampsia; Treating cesarean scar defect


 

“CESAREAN SCAR DEFECT:WHAT IS IT AND HOW SHOULD IT BE TREATED?”
CAMRAN NEZHAT, MD; LINDSEY GRACE, MD;ROSE SOLIEMANNJAD, BS;GITY MESHKAT RAZAVI, MD; AND AZADEH NEZHAT, MD (APRIL 2016)

Technique for preventing cesarean scar defect
I read with interest the proposed treatment options that Dr. Nezhat and colleagues suggested for cesarean scar defect. However, nowhere did I see mention of preventing this defect.

For 30 years I have been closing the hysterotomy in a fashion that I believe leaves no presence of an isthmocele and is a superior closure. I overlap the upper flap with the lower flap and, most importantly, close with chromic catgut. A cesarean scar “niche” occurs with involution of the uterus causing the suture line to bunch up. Chromic catgut has a shorter half-life and will “give;” a suture made of polypropylene will not stretch. I use a running interlocking line with sutures about 0.5 inches apart.

Donald M. Werner, MD
Binghamton, New York

Dr. Nezhat and colleagues respond
We thank Dr. Werner for his inquiry regarding the prevention of cesarean scar defects; as we all agree, the best treatment is prevention. As mentioned in our article, there are no definitive results from the studies published to date that show superiority of one surgical technique over another in regard to hysterotomy closure and prevention of cesarean scar defects. Possible risk factors for developing cesarean scar defects include low (cervical) hysterotomy, single-layer uterine wall closure, use of locking sutures, closure of hysterotomy with endometrial-sparing technique, and multiple cesarean deliveries. Although these factors may be associated with increased risk of cesarean scar defects, additional randomized controlled trials need to be performed prior to being able to offer a recommendation on a conclusive preventative measure. For additional information, I would direct you to references 3 and 4 in our article. We thank you for sharing your positive experience and eagerly await additional studies on the topic.

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