Conference Coverage

Etomidate drip quickly curbs severe hypercortisolism


 

AT ICE/ENDO 2014

References

CHICAGO – Continuous intravenous infusion of etomidate safely and swiftly gains control of severe hypercortisolism in patients with adrenocorticotropic hormone–dependent Cushing’s syndrome when conventional presurgical oral treatment is problematic.

"From our cumulative experience, we have now developed a standardized titrated etomidate infusion protocol, which should provide clinicians with a simple, safe, and effective means to lower serum cortisol in patients with severe clinical, metabolic, and neuropsychiatric consequences of prodigious hypercortisolism as a bridge to definitive medical or surgical therapy," explained Dr. Katarzyna G. Zarnecki at the joint meeting of the International Congress of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society.

Dr. Katarzyna G. Zarnecki

Etomidate (Amidate) is a sedative hypnotic agent with an excellent cardiovascular safety profile. It is widely used in emergency settings, such as reduction of dislocated joints and cardioversion. It suppresses adrenal steroidogenesis by potently inhibiting 11-beta hydroxylase. Fortunately for endocrinologic purposes, etomidate suppresses cortisol synthesis even at subhypnotic doses. In using it off label for management of severe hypercortisolism, it’s essential to keep the drug at subhypnotic doses, meaning not more than 0.3 mg/kg per hour, emphasized Dr. Zarnecki of the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Dr. Zarnecki and her coworkers utilize as their standard etomidate infusion protocol an initial 5-mg bolus followed by an infusion at 0.02 mg/kg per hour, with dose titration in increments of 0.01-0.02 mg/kg per hour every 4-6 hours based on changes in serum cortisol level. The goal is to bring the cortisol down to a target range of 10-20 mcg/dL.

She presented an illustrative six-patient series in which she and her colleagues turned to continuous infusion of etomidate because conventional oral therapy would have taken too long to rein in the severe hypercortisolism or because medication side effects were intolerable.

Mean baseline pretreatment serum cortisol was 138 mcg/dL, with an adrenocorticotropic hormone level of 419 pg/mL. Five of the six patients reached the goal of 10-20 mcg/dL in an average time of 64 hours. The mean rate of serum cortisol reduction was 1.93 mcg/dL per hour. The average etomidate infusion rate at the time the target level was reached was 0.07 mg/kg per hour, with a maximum rate of 0.1 mg/kg per hour. Monitoring via the Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale confirmed that none of the patients experienced sedative effects.

In the sole patient who didn’t reach goal, etomidate therapy was suspended because the patient entered palliative care because of extensive tumor progression.

Dr. Zarnecki reported having no financial conflicts of interest.

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