Conference Coverage

Increasing sepsis survivorship creates new challenges

 

Key clinical point: An analysis of one center’s sepsis cases revealed increases in sepsis survivors at risk for hospital readmission and returns of these patients to the hospital via the emergency department.

Major finding: The proportion of medical and surgical discharges at risk for hospital readmission after sepsis grew from 2.7% to 7.8%. The modest decline in 30-day readmission rates was offset by an increase in emergency department treat-and-release visits.

Data source: A retrospective, observational cohort study of more than 17,000 adult medical and surgical admissions in an academic health care system from 2010 to 2015.

Disclosures: The National Institutes of Health supported the work.

Source: Meyer N et al. Crit Care Med. 2018 Mar. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000002872.


 

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An upward trend in sepsis survivorship drove increases in sepsis survivors at risk for readmission and returns of these patients to the hospital via the emergency department, results of a retrospective, single-center analysis suggest.

Dr. Mark E. Mikkelson, associate professor of medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Andrew Bowser/Frontline Medical News

Dr. Mark E. Mikkelson

While 30-day readmission rates declined modestly over the same time period, that decrease was offset by a rise in emergency department treat-and-release visits, explained Dr. Mikkelsen, who coauthored the study.

Over the time period that Dr. Mikkelsen and his colleagues analyzed, the proportion of sepsis hospitalizations more than doubled from 3.9% to 9.4%, while in-hospital mortality rates for sepsis hospitalizations fell from 24.1% to 14.8%. As a result, the proportion of discharged patients at risk for readmission increased from 2.7% to 7.8%, noted Dr. Mikkelsen, associate professor of medicine at the Hospital of the University Of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.

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