Letters To The Editor

Prepping the vagina before cesarean delivery


 

References

"SHOULD YOU ADOPT THE PRACTICE OF VAGINAL CLEANSING WITH POVIDONE-IODINE PRIOR TO CESAREAN DELIVERY?"

ROBERT L. BARBIERI, MD (EDITORIAL; JANUARY 2016)

"PREVENTING INFECTION AFTER CESAREAN DELIVERY: 5 MORE EVIDENCE-BASED MEASURES TO CONSIDER"

KATHRYN E. PATRICK, MD; SARA L. DEATSMAN, MD; AND PATRICK DUFF, MD (DECEMBER 2016)

Prepping the vagina before cesarean delivery

I enjoyed your review of the topic. I am interested in using vaginal preparation prior to cesarean in the settings of active-phase and second-stage arrest. This should be most valuable since we anticipate possible prolonged attempt at head delivery. There may be a need for head elevation as well. Of course, we have become enthusiastic about using reverse breech extraction in difficult cases since your article a few years ago. I have yet to do a Patwardhan maneuver. That seems to rely on rotating the spine anteriorly to get the second arm out. With the head impaction, there is limited range for neck rotation. With vaginal preparation, is there any concern about fetal exposure to iodine?

Kimberly Harney, MD
Stanford, California

Dr. Barbieri responds

Dr. Harney raises the important issue of the potential adverse effects of povidone-iodine surgical preparation when used on a pregnant woman with ruptured membranes. There is very little direct evidence of a toxic effect of povidone-iodine on the fetus, but studies on women report that there is a transient increase in circulating iodine and iodine excretion following a vaginal povidone-iodine preparation.1 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has suggested that chlorhexidine might be a superior vaginal disinfectant than povidone-iodine,2 but chlorhexidine is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the vagina, and many surgical nursing directors favor the use of povidone-iodine in the vagina.3

"PREVENTING INFECTION AFTER CESAREAN DELIVERY: 5 MORE EVIDENCE-BASED MEASURES TO CONSIDER"

KATHRYN E. PATRICK, MD; SARA L. DEATSMAN, MD; AND PATRICK DUFF, MD (DECEMBER 2016)


Another way to prevent post-cesarean delivery infections

After 40 years in ObGyn practice (I am now retired), I find it interesting that experts have ignored a major potential source of infection--the operation team. Back in the day of Phisohex (hexachlorophene) use, we scrubbed our hands, arms, and fingers for a finite time--10 minutes--systematically and religiously. Our infection rates increased only when house staff rather than surgical assistants "helped" us. When scrubbing, I was always amazed that the house staff appeared at the sink long after I did and left before I had completed my presurgical ritual. (This was not true of non-MD assistants.) And my private practice postoperative infection rate reflected the difference. So perhaps the evidence is skewed away from this source of infection, which I submit may well be the major one!

Steve Melkin, MD
Phoenix, Arizona

Share your thoughts! Send your Letter to the Editor to rbarbieri@frontlinemedcom.com. Please include your name and the city and state in which you practice.

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