Commentary

Letter to the Editor: Tubal occlusion device removal


 

VIDEO: “LAPAROSCOPIC SALPINGECTOMY AND CORNUAL RESECTION REPURPOSED: A NOVEL APPROACH TO TUBAL OCCLUSION DEVICE REMOVAL”

MICHELLE PACIS, MD, MPH (JULY 2016)


Easier technique for removing tubal occlusion devices?

My patient’s rheumatologist recently asked me to remove the tubal occlusion device (Essure) inserts that I had placed approximately 5 years ago. I think the technique I used was a little easier than the one shown in the video by Dr. Pacis and featured by Dr. Advincula in his video series. I started with a standard salpingectomy from the fimbriated end, as did the technique in the video. Then I made a circumferential incision of the tubal serosa at the junction of the tube as it enters the cornua, taking care to not cut the device insert, which could be visualized and felt with cold shears. The proximal end of the device insert, including the post and coil, then easily pulled out with some elongation of the coil. Since I did not need to resect the cornua, I was able to easily seal off the small defect without need to suture.

Alexander Lin, MD
Chicago, Illinois

Dr. Pacis responds

Thank you for sharing your method for tubal occlusion device removal. Your technique would certainly work for devices that reside predominantly in the tube. We have found that many of the devices become quite anchored and adherent to the tubal mucosa. While there are many surgical approaches to device removal, our preference is to perform salpingectomy with cornual resection, so as to avoid traction on the microinsert, and remove the device intact. We are then able to give the specimen, which contains the insert, to pathology so they can comment on the status of the device.

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