Original Research

Procalcitonin-Guided Antibiotic Discontinuation: An Antimicrobial Stewardship Initiative to Assist Providers


 

References

From Western Michigan University, Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, MI (Dr. Vaillant and Dr. Kavanaugh), Ferris State University, Grand Rapids, MI (Dr. Mersfelder), and Bronson Methodist Hospital, Kalamazoo, MI (Dr. Maynard).

Abstract

  • Background: Procalcitonin has emerged as an important marker of sepsis and lung infections of bacterial origin. The role of procalcitonin in guiding antibiotic stewardship in lower respiratory tract infections and sepsis has been extensively studied, and use of this biomarker has been shown to decrease antibiotic usage in clinical trials. We sought to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist-driven initiative regarding discontinuation of antibiotics utilizing procalcitonin levels at a community teaching hospital.
  • Methods: We retrospectively gathered baseline data on adult patients admitted to a community teaching hospital who were 18 years of age and older, under the care of an inpatient service, and had a single procalcitonin level < 0.25 mcg/L obtained during admission. We then prospectively identified an intervention group of similar patients using a web-based, real-time clinical surveillance system. When a low procalcitonin level was identified in the intervention group, the participating clinical pharmacists screened for antibiotic use and the indication(s), determined whether the antibiotic could be discontinued based on the low procalcitonin level and the absence of another indication for antibiotics, and, when appropriate, contacted the patient’s health care provider via telephone to discuss possible antibiotic discontinuation. The total antibiotic treatment duration was compared between the baseline and intervention groups.
  • Results: A total of 172 patients were included in this study (86 in each group). The duration of antibiotic use was not significantly different between the baseline (3.14 ± 4.04 days) and the intervention (3.34 ± 2.8 days) groups (P = 0.1083). Other patient demographics did not influence antibiotic duration.
  • Conclusion: Our study did not demonstrate a difference in total antibiotic treatment duration with the utilization of procalcitonin and an oral communication intervention made by a clinical pharmacist at a community-based teaching hospital. Outside of clinical trials, and in the absence of an algorithmic approach, procalcitonin has not consistently been shown to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. It is important to have a comprehensive antimicrobial stewardship program to reduce antibiotic use and effectively use laboratory values.

Keywords: antibiotic use; bacterial infection; biomarkers; procalcitonin.

Procalcitonin is the precursor of the hormone calcitonin, which is normally produced in the parafollicular cells of the thyroid gland under physiological conditions.1 However, procalcitonin is also released in response to a proinflammatory stimulus, especially that of bacterial origin.1 The source of the procalcitonin surge seen during proinflammatory states is not the parafollicular cells of the thyroid, but rather the neuroendocrine cells of the lung and intestine.1 Stimulants of procalcitonin in these scenarios include bacterial endotoxin, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukin-6.1,2 Due to these observations, procalcitonin has emerged as an important marker of sepsis and lung infections of bacterial origin.3

The role of procalcitonin in guiding antibiotic stewardship in lower respiratory tract infections and sepsis has been extensively studied.4,5 Various randomized controlled trials have shown that antibiotic stewardship guided by procalcitonin levels resulted in lower rates of antibiotic initiation and shorter duration of antibiotic use.4-6 Similar results were obtained in prospective studies evaluating its role in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sepsis.7,8 Based on these data, protocol-driven procalcitonin-guided antibiotic stewardship appears beneficial.

Many of these studies employed rigorous protocols. Studies of procalcitonin use in a so-called real-world setting, in which the provider can order and use procalcitonin levels without the use of protocols, are limited. The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a pharmacist-driven initiative on discontinuing antibiotics, if indicated, utilizing single procalcitonin measurement results of < 0.25 mcg/L at a community teaching hospital.

Methods

Our study utilized a 2-phase approach. The first phase was a retrospective chart review to establish baseline data regarding adult inpatients with a low procalcitonin level; these patients were randomly selected over a 1-year period (2017). Patients were included if they were 18 years of age or older, under the care of an inpatient service, and had a single procalcitonin level < 0.25 mcg/L obtained during their admission. Patients admitted to the intensive care unit were excluded. In the second phase, we prospectively identified similar patients admitted between January and March 2018 using a web-based, real-time clinical surveillance system. When patients with low procalcitonin levels were identified, 2 participating clinical pharmacists screened for antibiotic use and indication. If it was determined that the antibiotic could be discontinued as a result of the low procalcitonin level and no additional indication for antibiotics was present, the pharmacist contacted the patient’s health care provider via telephone to discuss possible antibiotic discontinuation. Data collected before and after the intervention included total antibiotic treatment duration, white blood cell count, maximum temperature, age, and procalcitonin level.

A sample size of 86 was calculated to provide an alpha of 0.05 and a power of 0.8. A nonparametric Wilcoxon 2-sample test was used to test for a difference in duration of antibiotic treatment between the baseline and intervention groups. A nonparametric test was used due to right-skewed data. All patients were included in the group analysis, regardless of antibiotic use, as the procalcitonin level may have been used in the decision to initiate antibiotics, and this is more representative of a real-world application of the test. This allowed for detection of a significant decrease of 2 days in antibiotic duration post intervention, with a 10% margin to compensate for potential missing data. Data from 86 patients obtained prior to the pharmacist intervention acted as a control comparison group. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS 9.4.

Next Article: