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FDA approves new use for ibrutinib in WM


 

Photo courtesy of Janssen

Ibrutinib (Imbruvica)

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ibrutinib (Imbruvica®) for use in combination with rituximab to treat adults with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM).

This is the ninth FDA approval for ibrutinib and the second approval for the drug in WM.

The latest approval was supported by the phase 3 iNNOVATE trial, in which researchers compared ibrutinib plus rituximab to rituximab alone in patients with previously untreated or relapsed/refractory WM.

Results from iNNOVATE were presented at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting (abstract 8003) and simultaneously published in NEJM.

The trial enrolled 150 patients. They received rituximab at 375 mg/m2 with weekly infusions at weeks 1 to 4 and 17 to 20. They also received either ibrutinib (420 mg) or placebo once daily continuously until criteria for permanent discontinuation were met.

Overall response rates were significantly higher in the ibrutinib arm than the placebo arm—92% and 47%, respectively (P<0.0001). Complete response rates were 3% and 1%, respectively.

The median time to next treatment was not reached for the ibrutinib arm and was 18 months for the placebo arm (hazard ratio=0.096; P<0.0001). Of the patients randomized to ibrutinib plus rituximab, 75% continued on treatment at last follow-up.

The 30-month progression-free survival rates were 82% in the ibrutinib arm and 28% in the placebo arm. The median progression-free survival was not reached in the ibrutinib arm and was 20.3 months in the placebo arm (hazard ratio=0.20; P<0.0001).

The 30-month overall survival rates were 94% in the ibrutinib arm and 92% in the placebo arm.

Grade 3 or higher treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) occurred in 60% of patients in the ibrutinib arm and 61% in the placebo arm. Serious AEs occurred in 43% and 33%, respectively.

There were no fatal AEs in the ibrutinib arm and 3 in the rituximab arm.

Grade 3 or higher AEs that occurred more frequently in the ibrutinib arm than the placebo arm included atrial fibrillation (12% vs 1%) and hypertension (13% vs 4%).

AEs that occurred less frequently in the ibrutinib arm than the placebo arm included grade 3 or higher infusion reactions (1% vs 16%) and any-grade IgM flare (8% vs 47%).

About ibrutinib

Ibrutinib is a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is FDA-approved to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), and WM.

In November 2013, ibrutinib was approved to treat adults with MCL who have received at least one prior therapy.

In February 2014, ibrutinib was approved to treat adults with CLL who have received at least one prior therapy. In July 2014, ibrutinib received approval for adult CLL patients with 17p deletion, and, in March 2016, ibrutinib was approved as a frontline CLL treatment.

Ibrutinib was approved for use as a single agent in adults with WM in January 2015.

In May 2016, ibrutinib was approved in combination with bendamustine and rituximab for adults with previously treated CLL/SLL.

In January 2017, ibrutinib was approved for adults with MZL who require systemic therapy and have received at least one prior anti-CD20-based therapy.

In August 2017, ibrutinib was approved to treat adults with cGVHD that did not respond to one or more lines of systemic therapy.

Ibrutinib is jointly developed and commercialized by Pharmacyclics LLC, an AbbVie company, and Janssen Biotech, Inc.

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