CE/CME

May 2015: Click for Credit

Stay up to date on important developments in research and practice recommendations and earn CE/CME credit by reading the articles that follow. All posttests must be completed and submitted online.

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Topics include: Treatment for skin infections • Postmenopausal hormone therapy • Depression and cardiac risk • T2DM and familial hypercholesterolemia • Crohn disease remission


 

References

Here are 5 articles in the May issue of Clinician Reviews (accreditation valid until January 1, 2016):

1. Clindamycin, TMP-SMX Are Equally Effective for Skin Infections
To take the posttest, go to: http://bit.ly/1cVxR85

VITALS
Key clinical point:
Clindamycin and TMP-SMX had similar efficacy and adverse-effect profiles for treating uncomplicated skin infections, including both abscesses and cellulitis.
Major finding: At 7-10 days after therapy completion, the rates of cure in the evaluable population were 89.5% with clindamycin and 88.2% with TMP-SMX.
Data source: A prospective, multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trial involving 524 adults and children followed for 1 month after treatment.
Disclosures: This trial was supported by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCT00730028). Dr Miller reported receiving consulting fees from Cubist, Durata, and Pfizer; his associates reported ties to Cubist, Pfizer, EMMES, Theravance, AstraZeneca, Trius, Merck, and Cerexa.

2. Hormone Therapy 10 Years Postmenopause Increases Risks
To take the posttest, go to: http://bit.ly/1OBYcUe

VITALS
Key clinical point:
Hormone therapy in postmenopausal women increases stroke risk.
Major finding:
Stroke increased by 24%, venous thromboembolism by 92%, and pulmonary embolism by 81% in postmenopausal women receiving hormone therapy.
Data source:
A review and meta-analysis of 19 randomized controlled trials involving 40,140 postmenopausal women who received orally administered hormone therapy, placebo, or no treatment for prevention of cardiovascular disease.
Disclosures:
One study was funded by Wyeth-Ayerst. Two studies received partial funding from Novo-Nordisk Pharmaceutical, and one study was funded by the National Institutes of Health with support from Wyeth-Ayerst, Hoffman-La Roche, Pharmacia, and Upjohn. Eight other studies used medication provided by various pharmaceutical companies.

3. "Perfect storm" of Depression, Stress Raises Risk for MI, Death
To take the posttest, go to: http://bit.ly/1yM2HtF

VITALS
Key clinical point:
Concurrent depression and stress in coronary heart disease patients may increase early risk for MI and death.
Major finding:
CHD patients with high depressive symptoms and high stress at baseline had an increased risk for MI and death early during follow-up (adjusted HR, 1.48).
Data source:
A prospective cohort study of 4,487 adults.
Disclosures:
The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute supported the study. Dr Alcántara reported having no disclosures; two other authors received salary support from Amgen for research, and one served as a consultant for DiaDexus.

4. Type 2 Diabetes Lower in Familial Hypercholesterolemia
To take the posttest, go to: http://bit.ly/1bplTDc

VITALS
Key clinical point:
The prevalence of type 2 diabetes appears to be significantly lower in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia than in their unaffected relatives.
Major finding:
The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 1.75% in 25,137 patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, compared with 2.93% in 38,183 of their unaffected relatives.
Data source:
An observational cross-sectional analysis of data for 63,320 people in the Dutch national registry of familial hypercholesterolemia.
Disclosures:
The study sponsor was not specified; the familial hypercholesterolemia registry is subsidized by the Dutch government. Dr Besseling reported having no financial disclosures; his associates reported ties to Aegerion, Amgen, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Cerenis, Eli Lilly, Genzyme, JSiS, MSD, Novartis, Pfizer, Regeneron, Roche, and Sanofi.

5. Mongersen Induces 55%-65% Remission Rates in Crohn’s
To take the posttest, go to: http://bit.ly/1DctonL

VITALS
Key clinical point:
Mongersen, an oral SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotide, induced remission rates as high as 55%-65% in a small 2-week phase II clinical trial.
Major finding:
Rates of remission were 65% in the 43 participants who received 160 mg of mongersen, 55% in the 40 who received 40 mg, 12% in the 41 who received 10 mg, and 10% in the 42 who received placebo.
Data source:
A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II clinical trial involving 166 adults at 17 medical centers in Italy and Germany.
Disclosures: This study was sponsored by Giuliani, acting under contract to Nogra Pharma. Dr Monteleone reported ties to Giuliani, Novo Nordisk, Teva, Sirtris, Lycera, Sofar, and Zambon, and holds a patent related to the use of SMAD7 antisense oligonucleotides in Crohn’s disease. His associates reported financial ties to numerous industry sources.

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