CE/CME

Dizziness and Vertigo: Recognizing Vestibular Migraine in the Primary Care Setting

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Although accreditation for this CE/CME activity has expired, and the posttest is no longer available, you can still read the full article.

Expires June 30, 2015

Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of recurrent dizziness and vertigo but is often unrecognized by health care providers. VM causes significant impairment in level of function and quality of life, and the diagnosis should be considered when symptoms cannot be explained by other etiologies. Information and guidance are provided to raise clinicians’ awareness of VM in order to increase accurate diagnosis, guide management decisions, and improve patient health outcomes.


 

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CE/CME No: CR-1406

PROGRAM OVERVIEW
Earn credit by reading this article and successfully completing the posttest and evaluation. Successful completion is defined as a cumulative score of at least 70% correct.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
• Describe the clinical manifestations of vestibular migraine (VM).
• List classifications of medications known to induce vestibular symptoms.
• Describe the office-based tests used to evaluate vestibular function.
• List the diagnostic criteria for VM.
• Discuss the differential diagnosis of VM, including peripheral and central causes of vertigo.
• Discuss pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options for VM.

FACULTY
Jennifer Hart is an Instructor of Nursing at Wor-Wic Community College in Salisbury, Maryland. Mary Parsons is Director of the Graduate and Second Degree Nursing Programs at Salisbury University in Maryland.
The authors have no financial information to disclose.

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

This program has been reviewed and is approved for a maximum of 1.0 hours of American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) Category I CME credit by the Physician Assistant Review Panel. [NPs: Both ANCC and the AANP Certification Program recognize AAPA as an approved provider of Category 1 credit.] Approval is valid for one year from the issue date of June 2014.

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