CE/CME

Primary Hyperparathyroidism: A Case-based Review

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Although accreditation for this CE/CME activity has expired, and the posttest is no longer available, you can still read the full article.

Expires April 30, 2018

Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is most often detected as hypercalcemia in an asymptomatic patient during routine blood work. Knowing the appropriate work-up of hypercalcemia is essential, since untreated PHPT can have significant complications affecting multiple organ systems—most notably, renal and musculoskeletal. Parathyroidectomy is curative in up to 95% of cases, but prevention of long-term complications relies on prompt recognition and appropriate follow-up.


 

References


CE/CME No: CR-1705

PROGRAM OVERVIEW
Earn credit by reading this article and successfully completing the posttest and evaluation. Successful completion is defined as a cumulative score of at least 70% correct.

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
• Differentiate primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) from other causes of hypercalcemia and types of hyerparathyroidism.
• Understand the calcium-parathyroid hormone feedback loop.
• Identify appropriate imaging studies and common laboratory findings in the patient with PHPT.
• Describe the common systemic manifestations of PHPT.
• Discuss medical versus surgical management of the patient with PHPT.

FACULTY
Barbara Austin is a Family Nurse Practitioner at Baptist Primary Care, Jacksonville, Florida, and is pursuing a Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) at Jacksonville University.

The author has no financial relationships to disclose.

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

This program has been reviewed and is approved for a maximum of 1.0 hour of American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA) Category 1 CME credit by the Physician Assistant Review Panel. [NPs: Both ANCC and the AANP Certification Program recognize AAPA as an approved provider of Category 1 credit.] Approval is valid for one year from the issue date of May 2017.

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