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Nonwhite Race, Lower Socioeconomic Status Predicts Persistently Active AD

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Key clinical point: Persistently active atopic dermatitis is associated with nonwhite race, annual household income under $50,000, female sex, and history of atopy.

Major finding: Nonwhite race and history of atopy each lowered the odds of complete disease control by about 43% (odds ratios, 0.53; P less than .05).

Data source: A longitudinal cohort study of 6,237 patients aged 2-26 years from the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry (PEER).

Disclosures: Dr. Abuabara received a grant from the Clinical & Translational Science Institute of UCSF. She had no disclosures.


 

AT THE 2016 SID ANNUAL MEETING

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SCOTTSDALE, ARIZ. –Among patients with atopic dermatitis, persistently active disease was significantly more common among females of nonwhite race with a history of atopy than among patients without these characteristics, in an analysis of survey data from the Pediatric Elective Eczema Registry.

Annual household income under $50,000 also was a significant predictor of persistently active eczema, according to Katrina Abuabara, MD, of the department of dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, and her associates, who reported their results in a poster at the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology.

Dr. Katrina Abuabara

Dr. Katrina Abuabara

Atopic dermatitis often persists into adulthood, but few studies have explored contributors to poor disease control. To help fill that gap, the investigators analyzed 65,237 surveys from the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry (PEER), which tracks children and young adults aged 2-26 years with physician-diagnosed atopic dermatitis. The average age of the 6,237 patients was 7 years at enrollment (standard deviation, 4 years). They were followed at 6-month intervals for up to 10 years, with an average of about 10 surveys per respondent (standard deviation, 6.3 surveys).

In all, 4,607 patients (74% of the cohort) returned surveys spanning early childhood through their mid-20s. Only 15% of patients had “resolving” disease, meaning that as they aged, they increasingly reported complete disease control for periods of 6 months and longer.

The remaining 85% of patients had persistently active disease. In this group, 54% were female, 77% had a household income under $50,000 per year, 71% were nonwhite, and 75% had a history of atopy. Each of these characteristics significantly increased the odds of persistently active atopic dermatitis in the multivariable model (P less than .05 for each association).

Nonwhite race and history of atopy were the strongest predictors of persistently active disease – each lowered the odds of complete disease control by almost 50% (odds ratio, 0.53). Furthermore, females had 37% lower odds of complete disease control compared with males (OR, 0.63), and individuals with household income under $50,000 had 16% lower odds of complete disease control compared with those with higher annual incomes (OR, 0.84).

The link between lower socioeconomic status and persistently active eczema belies previous findings, the researchers noted. Those studies found that individuals of higher socioeconomic status were at greater risk for developing atopic dermatitis, but “failed to account for the chronic nature of the disease. In contrast, our results suggest that atopic dermatitis persistence may be associated with lower income and nonwhite race, and highlight the importance of longitudinal studies that permit analysis of mechanisms of disease control over time.”

Dr. Abuabara received a grant from the Clinical & Translational Science Institute of UCSF. She had no disclosures.

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