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Study: TKA patients recover faster with periarticular analgesia injection


 

FROM THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN OSTEOPATHIC ASSOCIATION

Patients more often recovered faster from a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) when they received a periarticular injection of analgesic medication than when they received a femoral nerve block for the same surgery on the opposite knee in a study.

The study included 16 recipients of bilateral primary TKA, who received a femoral nerve block at their first TKA operation and a periarticular injection of an extended-release bupivacaine liposome mixture at the second operation. An average of 2.3 years passed between the two procedures, and the same surgeon performed all surgeries, which occurred between March 2009 and August 2013. Two patients were excluded from the study because of subacute rehabilitation admission delay and a third patient was left out of the study because of respiratory failure, resulting in admission to the ICU.

Following the TKA with a periarticular injection of analgesic medication, the average number of inpatient physical therapy sessions a patient completed was 2.3 (standard deviation: 1.0); the average number of inpatient physical therapy sessions a patient completed after having the TKA with femoral nerve block was 3.5 (SD: 1.3). The average number of hospital days following the TKA with periarticular injection was also a smaller number. The mean number of hospital days following the periarticular injection was 1.5 (SD: 0.6 days). compared with 1.9 days (SD: 0.6 days; P is less than .032) following the femoral nerve block.

“Our data demonstrate that periarticular injection of analgesia allowed patients to complete their inpatient physical therapy sessions and to be discharged sooner, compared with femoral nerve block. This finding suggests that patients who receive periarticular injection of analgesia are able to ambulate independently faster because it does not affect postoperative motor function,” according to Dr. Brandon J. Horn and his colleagues.

Read the full study in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association (doi: 10.7556/jaoa.2015.146).

klennon@frontlinemedcom.com

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