From the Journals

Novel atopic dermatitis cream shows promise in phase 2 study

 

Key clinical point: Significantly more atopic dermatitis patients improved when treated with PAC-14028 cream, compared with those treated with a placebo vehicle.

Major finding: After 8 weeks, 58% of patients given the 1.0 cream achieved scores of 0 or 1 on the Investigator’s Global Assessment scale, compared with 15% for placebo patients.

Study details: The data come from a phase 2b randomized, double-blind trial including 194 atopic dermatitis patients.

Disclosures: AmorePacific funded the study. Dr. Lee disclosed relationships with AmorePacific, as well as LG Household & Health Care and Medytox.

Source: Lee YW et al. Br J Dermatol. 2019 Jan 8. doi: 10.1111/bjd.17455.


 

FROM THE BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY

Adults with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis showed significant improvement after 8 weeks of treatment with a novel topical cream, compared with a placebo group, based on data from 194 patients.

“Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily, member 1 (TRPV1) is expressed not only on sensory nerves, but also on keratinocytes, dendritic cells and sebocytes in the skin,” wrote Y.W. Lee, MD, of Konkuk University, Seoul, South Korea, and colleagues. Previous research suggests that TRPV1 may play a role in the inflammation and itching associated with atopic dermatitis, but use of a TRPV antagonist as treatment has not been well studied, the researchers said.

In a phase 2b trial published in the British Journal of Dermatology, the researchers randomized 194 adults with atopic dermatitis to one of three concentrations of a topical cream containing the selective TRPV1 antagonist PAC‐14028, or a placebo vehicle. The patients had baseline scores of 2 or 3 (mild to moderate) on the Investigator’s Global Assessment (IGA) scale. Patients were instructed to apply the cream twice daily to AD-affected areas.

After 8 weeks, treatment success (defined as a score of 0 or 1 on the IGA) occurred in 57% of patients given 1% cream, 38% of those given 0.3% cream, 43% of those given 0.1% cream, and 15% of those given a placebo cream.

In addition, other measures of improvement including the Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index, EASI 75/90, sleep disturbance score, and pruritus visual analogue scale (VAS) trended toward improvement in patients who received the treatment cream.

The mean change in the SCORAD index was significantly greater in the 0.1% and 1.0% groups, compared with the placebo group. Also of note, patients in the 1.0% cream group showed significant improvements in both sleep disturbance and VAS scores, compared with the placebo patients, the researchers said.

The incidence of adverse events was similar among the groups, and no treatment-related serious adverse events were reported. A total of 18 patients discontinued the study, but 193 received at least one dose of treatment cream.

The study findings were limited by several factors, including the small size and lack of comparison to treatment with topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors, the researchers noted.

However, the results support the safety and efficacy of PAC‐14028, they added. And “based on these results, a phase III program is underway to assess the efficacy and safety of PAC-14028 topical cream 10% in adolescent and adult patients with mild to moderate AD,” they said.

AmorePacific funded the study. Dr. Lee disclosed relationships with AmorePacific, as well as LG Household & Health Care and Medytox.

SOURCE: Lee YW et al. Br J Dermatol. 2019 Jan 8. doi: 10.1111/bjd.17455.

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