Article

Long-term follow-up after coronary artery bypass

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Abstract

Although coronary artery bypass has been proved to relieve angina effectively and improve the quality of life, the effects upon long-term survival are still being analyzed critically.

Patient population

A series of 846 consecutive and personally observed patients from one cardiology section who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass at the Texas Heart Institute from late 1969 through June 1976 were studied and the results are presented. Calculation of all percentages was based on the total population of 846. Men comprised 88% of the series. Sixty-five percent of the men were 50 years of age or older and 35% were 60 years or older. Preoperatively, functional Classes III and IV angina (New York Heart Association) was present in 63% and 19% respectively. Sixty-one percent demonstrated a changing pattern of angina during the immediate 60 days before operation. Previous myocardial infarction had occurred in 63%. Single-vessel disease (75% or greater occlusion) was present in 114 patients (14%): the right coronary artery in 23 (3%), the left anterior descending coronary artery in 80 (10%), and the left circumflex coronary artery in 11 (1%). Double-vessel disease was found in 290 patients (34%): the right coronary artery and left anterior descending coronary artery in 159 (19%), the right coronary artery and left circumflex coronary artery in 43 (5%), and the left anterior descending coronary artery in 88 (10%). Triple-vessel disease was present in 375 patients (44%). The main left coronary artery was involved (75% or more occlusion) in 68 patients (8%), and was associated with . . .


 

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