Conference Coverage

In HCC, histology and parenchyma more important than tumor size

Major finding: The influence of tumor size on overall survival was significant in univariate analyses but when the salvage transplantation cases were excluded, tumor size was no longer significant.

Data source: Study of 313 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent liver resection between 1989 and 2010 at a single center.

Disclosures: Dr. Kluger had no disclosures.


 

AT DDW 2013

ORLANDO – In hepatocellular carcinoma, tumor size did not independently influence recurrence or survival, whereas tumor histopathology and background parenchyma did, according to a retrospective, single-center study of 300 patients.

"These findings further support that prognosis and treatment guidelines cannot be effectively categorized based on tumor size," said Dr. Michael D. Kluger of the department of surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital–Cornell University, New York.

Although the procedure is hampered by high recurrence rates, resection is safe, readily available, and offers good overall survival, he said.

Also, "This strategy can allow for the more effective utilization of a limited (and dwindling) supply of transplantable livers; freeing other patients from the potential short- and long-term complications of undergoing unnecessary transplantation," Dr. Kluger said.

Meanwhile, "many treatments with curative intent remain available after recurrence, including re-resection, salvage transplantation, and ablation," he said.

He presented his abstract, which is not published, during the annual Digestive Disease Week.

Dr. Kluger and his colleagues studied 313 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who underwent liver resection between 1989 and 2010.

Patients were stratified based on tumor size of less than 50 mm (36%), 50-100 mm (36%), and more than 100 mm (28%).

Patients with larger tumors were more likely to have normal liver parenchyma: 43% of patients with tumors larger than 100 mm, compared with 1% of patients with tumors smaller than 50 mm (P less than .001).

The influence of tumor size on overall survival was significant in univariate analyses (less than 50 mm vs. 50-100 mm, P = .0321; less then 50 mm vs. more than 100 mm, P = 0.009; 50-100 mm vs. more than 100 mm, P = .57), said Dr. Kluger, but when the salvage transplantation cases were excluded, tumor size was no longer significant (P = .18, .07, and .65, respectively.)

Researchers found seven independent predictors that led to decreased overall survival: intraoperative transfusion (hazard ratio, 2.60), cirrhosis (HR, 2.42), poorly differentiated tumor (HR, 2.04), satellite lesions (HR, 1.68), microvascular invasion (HR, 1.48), alpha-fetoprotein more than 200 ng/mL (HR, 1.53), and salvage transplantation (HR, 0.23).

Median overall survival was 60 months. One-year overall survival was 76%, and 5-year overall survival was 50%. Meanwhile, 5-year survival of patients who underwent salvage transplantation from the time of occurrence was 90%, compared with 18% for those not undergoing the procedure (P less than .0001).

The median time to recurrence was 20 months, with 1-year recurrence-free survival at 61%, and 5-year recurrence-free survival at 28%.

Four variables independently affected recurrence-free survival, the authors noted: intra-operative transfusion (HR, 2.15), poorly differentiated tumor (HR, 1.87), cirrhosis (HR, 1.69), and microvascular invasion (HR, 1.71).

Patients with nontransplantable recurrences after resection of tumors smaller than 5 cm had similar overall survival, compared with patients whose tumors were originally 5 cm or larger.

The study also showed that the rate of complications decreased during the second decade of the study period. While the mortality rate between 1989 and 1999 was 14%, it dropped to 5% through 2010 (P less than .008).

"These improvements coincide with major advances in liver surgery, patient selection, anesthetic practices, liver imaging, and postoperative care," said Dr. Kluger in an interview. "We also believe that routine integration of laparoscopy for appropriate cases since 1998 was also critical to improvements in outcomes. Whereas 6% of the cases performed prior to 2000 utilized a laparoscopic technique, 30% performed after 2000 did."

Dr. Kluger said that "tumor size is a widely accepted but inadequate proxy for interactions within the tumor milieu. ... The onus is to determine which patients would most benefit from upfront listing for transplantation despite candidacy for resection, or resection with the future possibility of salvage transplantation for recurrence," he said.

Dr. Kluger had no disclosures.

nmiller@frontlinemedcom.com

On Twitter @NaseemSMiller

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