Conference Coverage

Intermittent dosing cuts time to extubation for surgical patients

 

Key clinical point: Among patients requiring ventilation, intermittent administration of sedation and analgesia significantly reduced mechanical ventilation time and total amount of drugs versus a continuous infusion approach.

Major finding: Mean mechanical ventilation time was 65 hours in the intermittent dosing arm, versus 111 hours in the continuous infusion arm (P less than 0.03).

Data source: A single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial of 95 surgical patients requiring ventilation.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures or conflicts of interest related to the study.

Source: Sich N et al. CCC47, Abstract 18.


 

Reporting from CCC47

SAN ANTONIO – Intermittent administration of sedation and analgesia significantly reduced mechanical ventilation time among surgical patients requiring ventilation, according to a preliminary analysis of a randomized trial.

Additionally, the researchers found that much lower amounts of sedation and analgesia were given to patients who underwent intermittent dosing, compared with patients who received a continuous infusion.

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Lead investigator Nicholas Sich, MD, presented these findings of the SATIRE trial (Sedation Administration Timing: Intermittent Dosing Reduces Times to Extubation), at the Critical Care Congress sponsored by the Society for Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Sich’s study was a 2-year, single-blinded, randomized, controlled trial of surgical patients requiring ventilation.

Of the 95 patients in the trial, 39 were randomized to intermittent dosing and 56 to the control group of continuous infusion, with the drugs midazolam and fentanyl having been given to both groups.

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