Conference Coverage

POP severity not linked to risk of de novo stress urinary incontinence

 

Key clinical point: The severity of pelvic organ prolapse does not seem to be factor in the risk of de novo stress urinary incontinence.

Major finding: Postsurgical rates of de novo SUI were 12.5% among women with massive POP and 10.6% among women with less severe POP (P = .6).

Data source: A single-center retrospective study of 206 patients who underwent surgical correction of POP and had no objective evidence of SUI at baseline.

Disclosures: The researchers did not report information on funding sources or financial disclosures.


 

AT PFD WEEK 2016

– Surgical correction of severe pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is no more likely to lead to stress urinary incontinence than is correction of less severe POP, suggest findings from a retrospective study of 206 patients at a tertiary care center.

But a baseline complaint of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) prior to surgery, despite a negative SUI evaluation, was associated with an increased risk, Alexandriah Alas, MD, and her colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic Florida in Weston wrote in a poster presented at Pelvic Floor Disorders Week, sponsored by the American Urogynecologic Society.

“We recommend counseling patients with a negative evaluation that there is up to a 10.6% risk of developing de novo SUI,” the researchers wrote.

Past studies have linked surgical correction of POP with a 16%-51% increase in risk of de novo SUI, but have not examined whether severe prolapse adds to that risk. The researchers reviewed records from patients who underwent surgical POP correction at their center between 2003 and 2013, excluding those with objective evidence of SUI at baseline or a history of incontinence surgery. They included patients with a baseline subjective complaint of SUI, as long as it was not the primary presenting complaint.

A total of 48 (23%) patients had massive POP – that is, a POP-Q score of at least 3 at points Ba, Bp, or C – and 158 patients had less massive POP, the researchers wrote. In all, 22 patients (10.6%) developed de novo SUI. Postsurgical rates of de novo SUI were 12.5% among women with massive POP and 10.6% among women with less severe POP (P = .6).

Women with massive POP tended to be older and had a higher incidence of hypertension than those with less severe POP. After controlling for these differences, a baseline complaint of SUI was the strongest predictor of de novo SUI, increasing the odds of this outcome more than fivefold (adjusted odds ratio, 5.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-23.9). Two other factors trended toward statistical significance in this multivariable model – a baseline complaint of mixed urinary incontinence and a longer POP-Q point D value (-9.5 instead of -7.5).

Among women with no baseline complaint of SUI, the incidence of de novo SUI was 6.3%. Significant predictors of de novo SUI in this subgroup included longer total vaginal length (10.5 cm vs. 9.5 cm, P = .003) and urinary leaks, even if they occurred about every other day as compared to not at all (P = .02).

The researchers did not report information on funding sources or financial disclosures.

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