Conference Coverage

Simple colon surgery bundle accelerated outcomes improvement

Key clinical point: Adoption of a colon bundle by a collaborative of Tennessee hospitals improved certain colectomy outcomes.

Major finding: Following adoption of a colon bundle, the rate of decrease in postoperative recurrences was greater in colectomy than for all other surgical procedures (P less than .001 for both the trend and the intercept statistical models).

Data source: An analysis conducted by members of the Tennessee Surgical Quality Collaborative, which included 23 hospitals in the state.

Disclosures: The researchers reported having no relevant financial disclosures.


 

AT THE ACS NSQIP NATIONAL CONFERENCE

References

SAN DIEGO – Implementation of a simple colon bundle decreased the rate of colonic and enteric resections faster, compared with improvements seen for other procedures, according to a study that involved 23 hospitals in Tennessee.

At the American College of Surgeons/National Surgical Quality Improvement Program National Conference, Brian J. Daley, MD, discussed findings from an analysis conducted by members of the Tennessee Surgical Quality Collaborative (TSQC), which he described as “a collection of surgeons who put aside their hospital and regional affiliations to work together to help each other and to help our fellow Tennesseans.” Established in 2008 with member hospitals, the TSQC has grown to 23 member hospitals, including 18 community hospitals and 5 academic medical centers. It provides data on nearly 600 surgeons across the state. “While this only represents about half of the surgical procedures in the state, there is sufficient statistical power to make comments about our surgical performance,” said Dr. Daley of the department of surgery at  the University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville.

©Dmitrii Kotin/Thinkstock.com

To quantify TSQC’s impact on surgical outcomes, surgeons at the member hospitals evaluated the TSQC colon bundle, which was developed in 2012 and implemented in 2013. It bundles four processes of care: maintaining intraoperative oxygen delivery, maintaining a temperature of 36° C, making sure the patient’s blood glucose is normal, and choosing the appropriate antibiotics. “We kept it simple: easy, not expensive, and hopefully helpful,” Dr. Daley said.

With other procedures as a baseline, they used statistical analyses to determine if implementation of the bundle led to an incremental acceleration of reduced complications, compared with other improvements observed in other procedures. “To understand our outcomes, we needed to prove three points: that the trend improved [a negative trend in the resection rate], that this negative trend was more negative than trends for other comparator procedures, and that the trend for intercept was not equal to the comparator in any way,” Dr. Daley explained.

Following adoption of the bundle, he and his associates observed that the rate of decrease in postoperative recurrences was greater in colectomy, compared with that for all other surgical procedures (P less than .001 for both the trend and the intercept statistical models). Adoption of the bundle also positively impacted decreases in postoperative recurrences among enterectomy cases (P less than .001 for both the trend and the intercept statistical models).

“We were able to demonstrate that our TSQC bundle paid dividends in improving colectomy outcomes,” Dr. Daley concluded. “We have seen these efforts spill over into enterectomy. From this we can also infer that participation in the collaborative improves outcomes and is imperative to maintain the acceleration in surgical improvement.”

Dr. Daley reported that he and his coauthors had no relevant financial disclosures.

dbrunk@frontlinemedcom.com

Next Article:

   Comments ()