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Patient-controlled epidural analgesia similar to intravenous

Key clinical point: Patient-controlled epidural analgesia achieves pain control similar to that of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia after spinal fusion surgery, but with more pruritus and paresthesia.

Major finding: Patient-controlled epidural analgesia achieved greater analgesic effects on day 1 and 2 after surgery but these differences were no longer significant by day 3.

Data source: A meta-analysis of eight randomized controlled trials in 482 patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery.

Disclosures: The National Natural Science Foundation of China supported the study. No conflicts of interest were declared.


 

FROM BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS

References

Patient-controlled epidural analgesia achieves pain control similar to that of patient-controlled intravenous analgesia after spinal fusion surgery, but is associated with a higher incidence of pruritus and paresthesia, a meta-analysis published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders has found.

The analysis of eight randomized controlled trials involving 482 patients found that patient-controlled epidural analgesia was associated with significantly better analgesic effects on day 1 and 2 after surgery (mean difference in visual analog scale scores of −0.47 and −0.66, respectively), but this difference was no longer statistically significant on day 3.

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The study, conducted by Dr. Peng Tian of Tianjin (China) Hospital and colleagues showed that patient-controlled epidural analgesia was associated with a significant 53% higher incidence of pruritus and a threefold increase in paresthesia, compared with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, although there were no significant differences in the rates of nausea or vomiting (BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2015 Dec 15. doi: 10.1186/s12891-015-0849-y).

Researchers noted that patient-controlled epidural analgesia achieves a faster analgesic effect than does patient-controlled intravenous analgesia because it acts directly on the near-operative region, but the analgesic effect of the intravenous administration lasts longer.

“The most important findings of the present meta-analysis are that the application of PCEA [patient-controlled epidural analgesia] does not more effectively relieve” pain in 3 postoperative days compared with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, “meanwhile increasing the incidence of some complications such as pruritus and paresthesia,” wrote the investigators.

The National Natural Science Foundation of China supported the study. No conflicts of interest were declared.

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