Clinical Edge

Summaries of Must-Read Clinical Literature, Guidelines, and FDA Actions

Perceived Stress and Inflammatory Arthritis in RA

In an at-risk cohort, there was an association between perceived distress and incident inflammatory arthritis (IA). Participants in the prospective cohort study in the Studies of the Etiologies of Rheumatoid Arthritis (SERA) were recruited if they were a first degree relative of a RA proband or screen positive for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibody (ACPA). Perceived stress was measured using the Perceived Stress Scale-14 (PSS) in which scores can range from 0-56 and a higher score indicates greater perceived stress. Researchers found:

  • The mean total PSS score was 20.4
  • A 1-point increased in the perceived distress score was significantly associated with a 10% in the risk of IA (adjusted HR: 1.10).
  • Total PSS and self-efficacy were not associated with IA risk (aHR: 1.05 and 1.04, respectively).

Citation:

Polinksi KJ, et al. Perceived stress and inflammatory arthritis: a prospective investigation in the Studies of the Etiologies of Rheumatoid Arthritis (SERA) cohort. [Published online ahead of print October 10, 2019]. Arthritis Care Res. doi: 10.1002/acr.24085.