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Risk of PTSD and MDD Following Mild TBI

JAMA Psychiatry; ePub 2019 Jan 30; Stein, et al

After mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), some individuals, on the basis of education, race/ethnicity, history of mental health problems, and cause of injury, were at substantially increased risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and/or major depressive disorder (MDD). This according to a study that aimed to ascertain prevalence of and risk factors for PTSD and MDD among patients evaluated in the emergency department (ED) for mTBI. A total of 1,155 patients with mTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score, 13-15) and 230 patients with non-head orthopedic trauma injuries aged ≥17 years were seen in 11 US hospitals with level 1 trauma centers. Researchers found:

  • Weights-adjusted prevalence of PTSD and/or MDD in the mTBI vs orthopedic trauma comparison groups at 3 months was 20.0% vs 8.7% and at 6 months was 21.2% vs 12.1%.
  • Risk factors for probable PTSD at 6 months after mTBI included less education, being black, self-reported psychiatric history, and injury resulting from assault or other violence.
  • Risk factors for probable MDD after mTBI were similar with the exception that cause of injury was not associated with increased risk.

Citation:

Stein MB, Jain S, Giacino JT, et al. Risk of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression in civilian patients after mild traumatic brain injury. A TRACK-TBI Study. [Published online ahead of print January 30, 2019]. JAMA Psychiatry. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.4288.