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Restrictive Eating, Non-Suicidal Self Injury Link

Compr Psychiatry; ePub 2018 Feb 11; Wang, et al

A recent study highlights the seriousness of restrictive eating, even within a nonclinical sample, as it is associated with heightened probability of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and clinical severity among those who engage in co-morbid NSSI. Therefore, it is suggested that healthcare providers screen for NSSI among individuals with restrictive eating. This study examined cross-sectional associations between self-reported restrictive eating, NSSI, and putative mechanisms of emotion regulation and interpersonal problems in a non-clinical sample of undergraduate students (n=98, 80.6% female), using the Dietary Restriction Screener, Deliberate Self-Harm Inventory, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Personality Disorders-25. They found:

  • Hierarchical logistic regression analyses indicated that restrictive eating was associated with NSSI above and beyond the influence of binge eating, purging, and relevant covariates.
  • In addition, multivariate analyses of variance revealed that the co-occurrence of restrictive eating and NSSI was associated with greater difficulties accessing and implementing effective, rather than impulsive, emotion regulation strategies when distressed than either behavior alone.
Citation:

Wang SB, Pisetsky EM, Skutch JM, Fruzzetti AF, Haynos AF. Restrictive eating and nonsuicidal self-injury in a nonclinical sample: Co-occurrence and associations with emotion dysregulation and interpersonal problems. [Published online ahead of print February 11, 2018]. Comp Psychiatry. doi:10.1016/j.comppsych.2018.02.005.