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CV Events in Blacks With Depression Symptoms

30% increase in adjusted incident stroke risk found

Symptoms of major depressive disorder were tied to greater risks of incident stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD) in blacks after adjusting for clinical and behavioral risk factors in an analysis of 3,309 participants in the Jackson Heart Study.

At baseline, 738 (22.3%) of the participants with no stroke history had symptoms of depression, as did 721 (21.8%) with no previous CHD.

Additionally:

• The unadjusted 10-year risk of stroke was similar among participants with any compared with no depressive symptoms (3.7% vs 2.6%).

• Unadjusted CHD rates were higher among those with depressive symptoms compared with no depressive symptoms (5.6% vs 3.6%); differences continued after adjusting for clinical and behavioral risk factors but not after adjusting for coping strategies.

• In adjusted models, patients with major depressive symptoms had twice the risk of stroke as those without symptoms.

• In continuous models, a 1-standard deviation increase in depression score was linked with a 30% increase in adjusted incident stroke risk.

Citation: O’Brien E, Greiner, M, Sims M, et al. Depressive symptoms and risk of cardiovascular events in blacks: Findings from the Jackson Heart Study. Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2015 Nov;8(6):552-559.