Clinical Edge

Summaries of Must-Read Clinical Literature, Guidelines, and FDA Actions

The Significance of Psychosis in BD, Schizophrenia

Bipolar Disord; ePub 2018 May 18; Bowie, et al

The presence of active psychosis is an important cross‐diagnostic factor in cognition and functioning in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD), according to a recent study. A total of 633 participants with BD-I, schizophrenia, and schizoaffective disorder were recruited for a study on the genetics of cognition and functioning in BD and schizophrenia. Participants were classified into 5 groups: BD with current psychosis (n=30), BD with a history of psychosis (n=162), BD with no history of psychosis (n=92), schizophrenia with current psychosis (n= 245), and schizophrenia with past psychosis (n=104). Researchers found:

  • Cognitive profiles of all groups were similar in pattern; however, both current psychosis and a diagnosis of schizophrenia were associated with greater impairment.
  • Schizophrenia with current psychosis was also associated with a superimposed severe impairment in processing speed.
  • Both psychosis and schizophrenia diagnosis were associated with poorer functional competence.
  • Individuals with BD and schizophrenia experienced similar impairments in real‐world functioning if they were experiencing current psychosis.

Citation:

Bowie CR, Best, MW, Depp C, et al. Cognitive and functional deficits in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia as a function of the presence and history of psychosis. [Published online ahead of print May 18, 2018]. Bipolar Disord. doi:10.1111/bdi.12654.