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Sleep, Physical Activity, and Screen-Time Examined

JAMA Pediatrics; ePub 2019 Feb 4; Knell, et al

Findings from a recent study indicate that only 5% of US high school students (3% of girls; 7% of boys) spend the optimal time sleeping and being physically active while limiting screen time, with important disparities shown by vulnerable subgroups. Cross-sectional data from the 2011, 2013, 2015, and 2017 cycles of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance Survey were used. Researchers found:

  • 59,397 participants were included in the unweighted data set.
  • Overall, 5.0% of US adolescents met recommendations for sleep, physical activity, and screen time concurrently.
  • Stratified analysis by sex revealed a lower proportion of girls (3.0%) than boys (7.0%) met all 3 behavioral recommendations.
  • The observed sex differences were consistent across all other subgroups of interest.
  • There were significant disparities in the odds of meeting all 3 behavioral recommendations by age, race/ethnicity, body mass index, marijuana use, and depressive symptoms.
  • Girls who reported alcohol use had 28% lower odds of meeting all the recommendations concurrently compared with girls who did not use alcohol.

Citation:

Knell G, Durand CP, Kohl III HW, Wu IHC, Gabriel KP. Prevalence and likelihood of meeting sleep, physical activity, and screen-time guidelines among US youth. [Published online ahead of print February 4, 2019]. JAMA Pediatrics. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.4847.