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Weight Gain & Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy

Obstet Gynecol; ePub 2018 Sep 7; Dude, et al

Among women with no hypertension in an index pregnancy, increased delivery-to-delivery weight gain was associated with an increased risk of hypertensive disorders in a subsequent pregnancy, a new study found. The case-control study included women who had 2 live singleton births of at least 24 weeks of gestation at a single maternity hospital from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2015, with no hypertensive disorder at index pregnancy. Among the details:

  • Of 1,033 women, 188 (18.2%) were diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder in the subsequent pregnancy; of these, 166 (88.3%) had a hypertensive disorder specific to pregnancy.
  • An increase of body mass index (BMI) of at least 2 kg/m2 between deliveries was independently associated with an increased risk of a hypertensive disorder in a subsequent pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.76).
  • Conversely, weight loss of 2 kg/m2 or more was associated with a decreased risk of a hypertensive disorder (adjusted OR 0.41).

Citation:

Dude AM, Shahawy S, Grobman WA. Delivery-to-delivery weight gain and risk of hypertensive disorders in a subsequent pregnancy. [Published online ahead of print September 7, 2018]. Obstet Gynecol. doi:10.1097/AOG.0000000000002874.