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Term Cesarean Delivery & Subsequent Preterm Delivery

Am J Obstet Gynecol; ePub 2019 Feb 22; Vahanian, et al

Cesarean delivery at term is not associated with an increase in preterm delivery, spontaneous or indicated, in the subsequent pregnancy, a new study found. The retrospective cohort study consisted of women with the first 2 consecutive singleton deliveries (2007‒2014) identified through a linked pregnancy database at a single institution. Women with a first pregnancy that resulted in cesarean delivery at term were compared to women whose first pregnancy resulted in a vaginal delivery at term. The primary outcome was the overall preterm delivery <37 weeks in the second pregnancy. Researchers found:

  • Of a total of 6,456 linked pregnancies, 2,284 deliveries were matched; 1,142 were preceded by cesarean delivery and 1,142 by vaginal delivery.
  • The risks of preterm delivery in the second pregnancy among women with a previous cesarean and vaginal delivery were 6.0% and 5.2%, respectively.
  • No associations were seen between cesarean delivery in the first pregnancy and spontaneous preterm delivery.
  • Similarly, no significant differences were found in late preterm delivery, early preterm delivery, or neonates with birthweight <5th percentile for gestational age.

Citation:

Vahanian SA, Hoffman MK, Ananth CV, et al. Term cesarean delivery in the first pregnancy is not associated with an increased risk for preterm delivery in the subsequent pregnancy. [Published online ahead of print February 22, 2019]. Am J Obstet Gynecol. doi:10.1016/j.ajog.2019.02.036.