Clinical Edge

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Low Social Support & Undesired Pregnancy

Contraception; ePub 2018 Jul 2; Moseson, et al

Low social support—defined as the feeling of not having anyone to turn to—may be a risk factor for persistently high levels of undesired pregnancy among young women in the US, a recent study found. Using 6 months of data from a prospective cohort study of 970 women aged 18-22 years in the US, researchers described contraceptive use and estimated adjusted odds and absolute risk of undesired pregnancy among women reporting low social support vs higher social support. They found:

  • 65 pregnancies were reported in the 6-month study period, of which nearly half were classified as undesired prior to conception.
  • Of young women who reported low social support, 8% reported an undesired pregnancy during the study period compared to 3% who reported higher levels of social support.
  • Among non-black women, those who reported low social support had nearly 7 times the odds of an undesired pregnancy vs women who reported higher social support (adjusted odds ratio: 6.8).
  • There was no association between social support and undesired pregnancy among young black women.

Citation:

Moseson H, Dehlendorf C, Gerdts C, Vittinghoff E, Hiatt RA, Barber J. No one to turn to: low social support and the incidence to undesired pregnancy in the United States. [Published online ahead of print July 2, 2018]. Contraception. doi:10.1016/j.contraception.2018.06.009.