Migraine Briefs

Static and Dynamic Functional Connectivity in Migraine


 

Resting-state functional imaging revealed static functional connectivity and dynamic functional connectivity differences between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache for regions involved in pain processing, a new study found. The case-control study integrated the static functional connectivity and dynamic functional connectivity patterns of 59 a priori selected regions of interest involved in pain processing. Pairwise connectivity differences between migraine (n=33) and persistent post-traumatic headache (n=44) were determined and compared to healthy controls (n=36) with ANOVA and subsequent t-tests. Researchers found:

  • Significant differences in static functional connectivity between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache were found for 17 region pairs.
  • Significant differences in dynamic functional connectivity between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache were found for 10 region pairs.
  • These differences in functional connectivity may be indicative of pathophysiology associated with migraine vs persistent post-traumatic headache.

Dumkrieger G, et al. Static and dynamic functional connectivity differences between migraine and persistent post-traumatic headache: A resting-state magnetic resonance imaging study. [Published online ahead of print May 1, 2019]. Cephalalgia. doi: 10.1177/0333102419847728.

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