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Activity Predicts Less Disability Before/After Stroke

Neurology; ePub 2017 Apr 5; Rist, Capistrant, et al

Physical inactivity predicts a higher risk of being dependent both before and after stroke, according to a recent study. Using a prospective cohort, the Health and Retirement Study, researchers followed adults without a history of stroke in 1998 (n=18,117) for up to 14 years. They estimated linear regression models of instrumental or basic activities of daily living (I/ADL) trajectories, comparing individuals who remained stroke-free throughout follow-up (n=16,264), those who survived stroke (n=1,374), and those who died after stroke and before the next interview wave (n=479). They found:

  • Compared to those who were physically active, stroke survivors who were physically inactive at baseline had a lower probability of independence in ADLs and IADLs 3 years after stroke.
  • However, a similar difference in the probability of independence was also present 3 years before stroke, and there was no evidence that physical activity slowed the rate of decline in independence before or after stroke.

Citation:

Rist PM, Capistrant BD, Mayeda ER, Liu SY, Glymour MM. Physical activity, but not body mass index, predicts less disability before and after stroke. [Published online ahead of print April 5, 2017]. Neurology. doi:10.1212/WNL.0000000000003888.