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Similar outcomes for extraskeletal and skeletal Ewing sarcomas in adults

Lynch A et al. Surgical Oncology 2018: 27; 373-379. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.suronc.2018.05.016

Key clinical point: Demographic, histological, and treatment characteristics differ, but the prognosis is similar, for extraskeletal and skeletal Ewing sarcomas in adults. Survival and independent predictors of survival are consistent between the two diagnoses.

Main finding: Patients with extraskeletal Ewing sarcomas were older, more likely to be female, and to have smaller tumors. Among these patients, 4.3% received no treatment, 5.6% received local therapy only, 15.6% received chemotherapy only, 47% received local and chemotherapy, and 21.6% received triple therapy. Among patients with skeletal Ewing sarcomas, 4% received no treatment, 2.5% received local therapy only (surgery and/or radiation), 16.8% received chemotherapy only, 52.2% received local and chemotherapy, and 17% received triple therapy (surgery, radiation and chemotherapy). Despite the variations in treatment approach, overall survival was comparable for the two groups (P = 0.816). Factors independently associated with overall survival for both groups included age, Charlson-Deyo Score (CDS) of 2 or more, combination therapy, and triple therapy. For patients with extraskeletal Ewing sarcomas, PNET histology also was associated with overall survival.

Study details: Retrospective study of 2,660 patients with Ewing sarcomas in the National Cancer Database.

Disclosures: The authors had no relevant financial disclosures.

Source: Lynch A et al. Surgical Oncology 2018: 27; 373-379. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.suronc.2018.05.016

Citation:

Lynch A et al. Surgical Oncology 2018: 27; 373-379. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.suronc.2018.05.016