Movers in Medicine

Researchers honored by ACS, IASLC


 

The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) is naming the Translational Research Lectureship Award after Fred R. Hirsch, MD, PhD, of the Tisch Cancer Institute and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York.

Fred R. Hirsch, MD, PhD, of Mount Sinai

Dr. Fred R. Hirsch

Dr. Hirsch was a longtime member of the IASLC and served as chief executive officer of the association from 2013 through October 2018. During this time, Dr. Hirsch grew the IASLC staff from 5 to 23 people and doubled the organization’s membership. The IASLC World Conference on Lung Cancer became an annual meeting under Dr. Hirsch’s direction and reported record attendance, according to their website.

The recipient of the Fred R. Hirsch Lectureship Award for Translational Research will be recognized at the IASLC 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer, which is set to take place in Singapore on August 9-12, 2020.

In other news, the American Cancer Society (ACS) announced that it has awarded the 2020 Medal of Honor to three researchers. The recipients will be recognized at a black-tie ceremony in New York on Nov. 11, 2020.

Lewis C. Cantley, PhD, of Weill Cornell Medical College

Dr. Lewis C. Cantley

Lewis C. Cantley, PhD, of Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, won the Medal of Honor for Basic Research. This award honors researchers whose work will have a “lasting impact on the cancer field” or who have made important discoveries or inventions within the field, according to the ACS.

Dr. Cantley won the award for research that has improved our understanding of cancer metabolism. He is known for his contributions to the discovery and study of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, which plays a role in many cancers and has become a target for therapies.

Leslie Bernstein, PhD, of City of Hope

Dr. Leslie Bernstein

Leslie Bernstein, PhD, of City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, Calif., has won the Medal of Honor in Cancer Control. This award honors individuals who have made strides in public health, public communication, or public policy that have had an impact on cancer control.

Dr. Bernstein won the award for her work linking physical activity to a reduced risk of breast cancer. She is currently investigating links between hormone exposures, physical activity, obesity, and cancer, as well as examining how breast cancer impacts patients’ lives after treatment.

Ching-Hon Pui, MD, of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Dr. Ching-Hon Pui

Ching-Hon Pui, MD, of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., has won the Medal of Honor in Clinical Research. This award honors researchers whose work has significantly improved cancer patients’ outcomes.

Dr. Pui won the award for his work in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Dr. Pui’s work has led to increased global treatment access, improved survival rates, and better quality of life for patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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