From the Journals

New genetic subtypes could facilitate precision medicine in DLBCL

 

Key clinical point: Multiplatform analyses identified four new genetic subtypes of DLBCL.

Major finding: The subtypes were distinguishable based on multiple genetic aberrations, phenotypes, and treatment responses.

Study details: Study of 574 DLBCL samples using exome and transcriptome sequencing, array-based DNA copy-number analysis, and targeted amplicon resequencing of 372 genes.

Disclosures: Funders included the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, the Dr. Mildred Scheel Stiftung fur Krebsforschung (Deutsche Krebshilfe), the Washington University in St. Louis, and the Kay Kendall Leukaemia Fund. Dr. Schmitz disclosed research funding from Dr. Mildred Scheel Stiftung fur Krebsforschung (Deutsche Krebshilfe).

Source: Schmitz et al. New Eng J Med. 2018 Apr 11. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1801445.


 

FROM NEJM


Genetically subtyping DLBCL could help guide patients into appropriate clinical trials, the investigators wrote. For example, patients with the N1 subtype might be candidates for immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy, given N1’s prominent T-cell gene expression and poor response to R-CHOP.

Funders included the National Institutes of Health, the National Cancer Institute, the Dr. Mildred Scheel Stiftung fur Krebsforschung (Deutsche Krebshilfe), the Washington University in St. Louis, and the Kay Kendall Leukaemia Fund. Dr. Schmitz disclosed research funding from Dr. Mildred Scheel Stiftung fur Krebsforschung (Deutsche Krebshilfe).

SOURCE: Schmitz et al. New Eng J Med. 2018 Apr 11. doi: 10.1056/NEJMoa1801445.

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