Clinical Edge

Summaries of Must-Read Clinical Literature, Guidelines, and FDA Actions

Gender Differences in Patients Hospitalized with Cirrhosis

J Clin Gastroenterol; ePub 2019 Feb 22; Rubin, et al

In patients hospitalized with cirrhosis in the US, women had lower rates of hepatic decompensating events and higher rates of nonhepatic comorbidities and infections than men, resulting in lower in-hospital mortality. Researchers analyzed data from the National Inpatient Sample (NIS), years 2009‒2013, to identify patients with any diagnosis of cirrhosis. The primary outcome was inpatient mortality. Among the details:

  • The cohort included 553,017 patients with cirrhosis (39% women; median age 57; 66% non-Hispanic white) admitted from 2009‒2013.
  • Women were more likely than men to have noncirrhosis comorbidities, including diabetes and hypertension, but less likely to have most cirrhosis complications, including ascites and variceal bleeding.
  • Women were more likely to have acute bacterial infections but were less likely than men to die in the hospital.

Citation:

Rubin J, Sundaram V, Lai JC. Gender differences among patients hospitalized with cirrhosis in the United States. [Published online ahead of print February 22, 2019]. J Clin Gastroenterol. doi:10.1097/MCG.0000000000001192.

Must Reads in Endoscopy, Pancreas, & Biliary Tract

Gender Differences in Patients Hospitalized with Cirrhosis, J Clin Gastroenterol; ePub 2019 Feb 22; Rubin, et al

POC Test for Identifying Viraemic HCV Infection, J Hepatol; ePub 2019 Feb 21; Freiman, et al

Frailty in Patients with Ascites & Hepatic Encephalopathy, Gastroenterology; ePub 2019 Jan 19; Lai, et al

Hypercholesterolemia & Statin Exposure in Cirrhosis, Gastroenterology; ePub 2019 Jan 18; Kaplan, et al

Response to UDCA Treatment in PBC Patients, Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol; ePub 2019 Jan 4; Cheung, et al