Clinical Edge

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Lung Cancer Incidence in Young Men & Women

N Engl J Med; 2018 May 24; Jemal, et al

The age-specific incidence of lung cancer has generally decreased among both men and women aged 30 to 54 years in all races and ethnic groups in the US over the past 2 decades. This according to a study that examined the nationwide population-based incidence of lung cancer according to sex, race or ethnic group, age group (30-34, 35-39, 40-44, 45-49, and 50-54 years), year of birth (1945 to 1980), and calendar period of diagnosis (1995-1999, 2000-2004, 2005-2009, and 2010-2014). Researchers also examined the prevalence of cigarette smoking. They found:

  • The decline in age-specific incidence of lung cancer in men has been steeper than among women over the past 20 years.
  • The patterns of historically higher incidence rates among men than among women have reversed among non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics born since the mid-1960s.
  • The prevalence of cigarette smoking among women born since 1965 had approached, but generally not exceeded, the prevalence among men.
Citation:

Jemal A, Miller KD, Ma J, et al. Higher lung cancer incidence in young women than young men in the United States. N Engl J Med. 2018;378:1999-2009. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa1715907.