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Opioid Use & Insomnia in Adults with Chronic Pain

Sleep Med; ePub 2018 Sep 5; Miller, Chan, et al

Among adults with chronic pain, opioid use was associated with more difficulty falling asleep; however, this effect was only significant among those reporting lower pain intensity. This according to a recent study where researchers aimed to determine if pain intensity moderates the association between opioid use and insomnia symptoms among adults with comorbid symptoms of insomnia and chronic widespread pain. Among the details:

  • 144 participants (mean age 51.6 years, 95% female) completed assessments of insomnia symptoms, pain, and use of sleep/pain medication.
  • Stronger pain intensity was associated with longer wake after sleep onset (WASO) and worse sleep quality, independent of opioid use.
  • Opioid use and pain intensity interacted in the prediction of sleep onset latency.
  • This association was only significant in the context of less severe pain.

Citation:

Miller MB, Chan WS, Curtis AF, et al. Pain intensity as a moderator of the association between opioid use and insomnia symptoms among adults with chronic pain. [Published online ahead of print September 5, 2018]. Sleep Med. doi:10.1016/j.sleep.2018.08.015.