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Air Pollutants, Spontaneous Pregnancy Loss Linked

Fertil Steril; ePub 2018 Dec 4; Leiser, Hanson, et al

Short-term exposure to elevated levels of air pollutants was associated with higher risk for spontaneous pregnancy loss, according to a recent study. Researchers evaluated 1,398 women who experienced spontaneous pregnancy loss events at an academic emergency department in the Wasatch Front area of Utah. They found:

  • A 10-ppb increase in 7-day average levels of nitrogen dioxide was associated with a 16% increase in the odds of spontaneous pregnancy loss (odds ratio [OR]=1.16).
  • A 10-μg/m3 increase in 3-day and 7-day averages of fine particulate matter were associated with increased risk of spontaneous pregnancy loss, but the associations did not reach statistical significance (OR3-day average=1.09) (OR7-day average=1.11).
  • There was no evidence of increased risk for any other metrics of nitrogen dioxide or fine particulate matter or any metric for ozone.
Citation:

Leiser CL, Hanson HA, Sawyer K, et al. Acute effects of air pollutants on spontaneous pregnancy loss: A case-crossover study. [Published online ahead of print December 4, 2018]. Fertil Steril. doi:10.1016/j.fertnstert.2018.10.028.