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Sleep Duration and Postpartum Weight Change

Obesity; ePub 2018 Dec 30; Herring, Yu, et al

Sleeping <7 hours per night was associated with late postpartum weight gain in minority mothers, a recent study found. Researchers analyzed data from 159 mothers (69% black, 32% Hispanic). Nocturnal sleep duration was assessed using wrist actigraphy at 6 weeks and 5 months postpartum, examined as a continuous variable and in categories (<7 vs ≥7 hours per night, consistent with American Academy of Sleep Medicine recommendations). Body weights were abstracted from medical records in pregnancy and measured at 6 weeks, 5 months, and 12 months postpartum. Outcomes included early postpartum (6 weeks to 5 months) and late postpartum (5 to 12 months) weight changes. They found:

  • The majority of participants slept <7 hours per night at 6 weeks (75%) and 5 months (63%) postpartum.
  • Early postpartum weight change did not differ by 6‐week sleep duration category.
  • By contrast, adjusted average late postpartum weight gain was 1.8 (0.7) kg higher in participants sleeping <7 hours per night at 5 months postpartum compared with those sleeping ≥7 hours per night.
  • Results did not show statistically significant associations of continuous measures of sleep duration, nor of measures of sleep quality, with postpartum weight changes.
Citation:

Herring SJ, Yu D, Spaeth A, et al. Influence of sleep duration on postpartum weight change in black and Hispanic women. [Published online ahead of print December 30, 2019]. Obesity. doi:10.1002/oby.22364.