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Smoking, Not Alcohol, Linked with Psoriasis Risk

J Am Acad Dermatol; 2019 Mar; Dai, et al

Current smoking increased the risk of psoriasis, particularly augmented for individuals who smoked >25 cigarettes per day and for >20 pack-years, while alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with psoriasis development. This according to a recent study that sought to investigate the effects of alcohol and smoking on incident psoriasis. Alcohol consumption, smoking status, and other covariates were collected from 4 rounds (2001, 2005, 2009, and 2013) of a national health interview survey. Incident psoriasis was identified from the National Health Insurance database. Cox regression model was used for the analysis. Researchers found:

  • Of 60,136 subjects, 242 (0.40%) developed psoriasis.
  • After controlling for demographics and comorbidities, alcohol consumption was not significantly associated with psoriasis risk.
  • Conversely, psoriasis risk was higher for current smokers than never smokers (adjusted hazard ratio 1.47).
  • The risks were higher among subjects who smoked >25 cigarettes per day and for >20 pack-years.
  • In subgroup analysis, current smoking was significantly associated with risk of psoriasis without psoriatic arthritis but not psoriatic arthritis alone.

Citation:

Dai Y-X, Wang S-C, Chou Y-J, et al. Smoking, but not alcohol, is associated with risk of psoriasis in a Taiwanese population-based cohort study. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019;80(3):727–734. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2018.11.015.