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Sunless Tanning and Risky Cancer-related Behaviors

JAMA Dermatology; ePub 2018 Jul 25; Dodds, Arron, et al

Sunless tanning is associated with risky skin cancer-related behaviors, according to a recent study that sought to assess the demographic characteristics and skin cancer risk behaviors of sunless tanners in the US. This secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study used data from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey, a population-based survey of the US noninstitutionalized civilian population. Participants included 27,353 men and women ≥18 years. Researchers found:

  • Of the total cohort (representative of >198 million US adults; mean [SE] age, 46.0 [0.2] years), 6.4% [SE, 0.2%]) reported sunless tanning.
  • Factors associated with sunless tanning included being young, female, non-Hispanic white, college educated, non-obese, and sun sensitive, living in the western US, and having a family history of skin cancer.
  • Sunless tanners were more likely to report indoor tanning, recent sunburn, use of sunscreen, and having had a full-body skin examination, but less likely to seek shade or use protective clothing when outdoors.

Citation:

Dodds M, Arron ST, Linos E, Polcari I, Mansh MD. Characteristics and skin cancer risk behaviors

of adult sunless tanners in the United States. [Published online ahead of print July 25, 2018]. JAMA Dermatology. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2018.2054.