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Dietary Sodium to Potassium Ratio and Stroke Risk

Stroke; ePub 2017 Oct 10; Willey, Gardener, et al

A higher dietary sodium to potassium (Na:K) ratio is an independent predictor of stroke risk, according to a recent study. Stroke-free participants from the Northern Manhattan Study, a population-based cohort study of stroke incidence, were followed-up for incident stroke. Baseline food frequency questionnaires were analyzed for Na and K intake. Researchers estimated the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of Na:K with incident total stroke using multivariable Cox proportional hazards models. They found:

  • Among 2,570 participants with dietary data (mean age, 69±10 years; 64% women; 21% white; 55% Hispanic; 24% black), the mean Na:K ratio was 1.22±0.43.
  • Over a mean follow-up of 12 years, there were 274 strokes.
  • In adjusted models, a higher Na:K ratio was associated with increased risk for stroke and specifically ischemic stroke.

Citation:

Willey J, Gardener H, Cespedes S, Cheung YK, Sacco RL, Elkind MSV. Dietary sodium to potassium ratio and risk of stroke in a multiethnic urban population. The Northern Manhattan Study. [Published online ahead of print October 10, 2017]. Stroke. doi:10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.017963.