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Course and outcome of Guillain-Barré syndrome measured in ongoing study


 

SUMMARY FROM CLINICALTRIALS.GOV

The International Guillain-Barré Syndrome Outcome Study (IGOS) is actively recruiting patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) to examine disease course and outcome, according to ClinicalTrials.gov.

IGOS is conducted by the members of the Inflammatory Neuropathy Consortium and Peripheral Nerve Society, and the researchers plan to identify clinical and biological determinants and predictors of disease course and outcome in individual patients with GBS as early as possible after onset of disease. It is a prospective study with standardized collection of clinical data and biomaterials from a large group of well-defined GBS patients during a long follow-up period. Patients will be divided into four cohorts: GBS patients with a follow-up of 1-3 years, normal controls, infectious controls, and other neurological diseases.

The primary outcome is to receive a disability score and Medical Research Council sum score within a 1-year time frame. Secondary outcomes include Overall Neuropathy Limitations Scale, Fatigue Severity Scale, EurQol EQ-5D health questionnaire, and Rasch-built Overall Disability Scale, all in a 1-year time frame. The information will be used to understand the diversity in clinical presentation and response to treatment of GBS and will also be used to develop new prognostic models to predict the clinical course and outcome accurately in individual patients with GBS.

Enrollment for the study started May 2012 and the researchers aim to enroll an estimated 4,000 participants. As of April 2017, the IGOS has enrolled more than 1,500 patients, according to the study’s website. The study is expected to be completed by January 2019. All patients with GBS or variants of GBS, including the Miller Fisher syndrome and overlap syndromes, are eligible for the study.

Currently, patients with GBS have not shown improvement over the last 20 years. It is estimated that 10%-20% of patients remain severely disabled and about 5% die from GBS.

Find the full summary here.

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