Article

II. Intraarticular Administration of Nitrogen Mustard Alone and Combined with a Corticosteroid for Rheumatoid Arthritis

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Abstract

DURING and after World War II extensive studies were made of the effects of HN2 (nitrogen mustard) on various body tissues,26 however no tissue have been encountered. Because of the observed suppressive action of intravenously administered HN2 on acute joint inflammation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (part I), it seemed worthwhile to study the effect of intraarticularly administered HN2 on synovial tissue, both experimentally and clinically.

Experimental Study

Material and methods. Fifteen joints of seven healthy normal dogs were used in the study. Ten were injected with HN2** alone, three with a combination of HN2 and hydrocortisone tertiary-butylacetate (hereinafter termed H.T.B.A.), one with H.T.B.A. alone, and one was used as a control. Histologic examination was made of specimens of synovium obtained by open joint exploration, the dogs being sacrificed from 2 to 30 days after injection. Histologic specimens were fixed in Zenker’s acetic acid fixing fluid (modified) and were stained with hematoxylin, eosin, and methylene blue. In the 14 experiments, the agent, dose, and time of examination were as follows:

AgentDose, mg.Time of examination, no. of days after injection
HN20.252
HN20.254
HN20.257
HN20.502
HN20.504
HN20.507
HN21.02
HN21.04
HN21.07
HN21.030
HN20.254
H.T.B.A25.0
HN20.54
H.T.B.A.25.0
HN21.04
H.T.B.A.25.0
H.T.B.A.50.07

Results. During the period of observation before sacrifice, there was no evidence of pain on motion of any of the . . .


 

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