Conference Coverage

Tumor boards linked to improved survival in hepatocellular carcinoma

Key clinical point: The use of multidisciplinary tumor boards was associated with significantly improved overall survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

Major finding: The risk of death within 5 years dropped by about 13% (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.94; P less than .001).

Data source: A retrospective study of 3,989 Veterans Affairs patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

Disclosures:
The work was funded by unrestricted grants from Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals and the VA’s HIV, Hepatitis and Public Health Pathogens Programs. The investigators had no relevant financial disclosures.


 

AT THE LIVER MEETING 2016

– Veterans were about 13% less likely to die within 5 years of hepatocellular carcinoma diagnosis when multidisciplinary tumor boards managed their care than if they did not, according to a large, multicenter observational study.

Seeing a hepatologist or surgeon within 30 days of diagnosis also significantly improved 5-year overall survival, even after controlling for age, race, Charlson-Deyo comorbidity index, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage, academic center and geographic region of care, and the distance patients lived from the nearest Veterans Affairs transplant center, Marina Serper, MD, reported at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. “More studies are needed to understand how to best use multidisciplinary tumor boards to improve the care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma,” she said.

Outcomes data for hepatocellular carcinoma mostly come from clinical trials; transplant centers; and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare analyses, noted Dr. Serper of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

For a better look at veterans, she and her associates combined administrative, laboratory, and death data with medical chart reviews and information from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network’s Standard Transplant Analysis and Research file. The initial cohort included more than 6,800 veterans whose ICD-9CM diagnosis code indicated a malignant hepatic neoplasm. Excluding patients with neoplasms such as cholangiocarcinoma and those managed outside the VA left 3,989 VA patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

In the multivariable analysis, use of multidisciplinary tumor boards was associated with a statistically significant 13% improvement in 5-year overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.81-0.94; P less than .001). Improved survival also was linked with seeing certain specialists within 30 days of diagnosis, including hepatologists (HR, 0.77; P less than .001) and surgeons (HR, 0.72; P less than .001). Consulting with a hepatologist within 30 days of diagnosis, however, did not improve the chances of receiving curative therapy, such as liver transplantation, resection, local ablation, transarterial chemoembolization, or Y-90 radioembolization.

Care also varied substantially geographically and by academic affiliation, Dr. Serper noted. “Treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma is complex, as it depends as much on liver function as it does on tumor staging,” she emphasized. “Studies to improve multidisciplinary approaches for hepatocellular carcinoma in the community are needed to increase rates of curative therapy and improve clinical outcomes.”

Patients in this study averaged 62 years of age at diagnosis, 54% were white, 36% were within Milan criteria, and 45% had a Child-Turcotte-Pugh score of B or higher. Nearly 18% had macrovascular invasion at diagnosis, and 7% had metastatic disease. Nearly two-thirds of patients were BCLC stage A or B at diagnosis, and more than a third had underlying alcohol misuse and chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

The work was funded by unrestricted grants from Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals and the VA’s HIV, Hepatitis and Public Health Pathogens Programs. The investigators had no relevant financial disclosures.

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