Picture This

Tick, Tick, Boom

Match the diagnosis to the photo by letter
a. Lyme disease
b. Rocky Mountain spotted fever
c. Tularemia

For answers, see next issue; for discussion, go to www.mdedge.com/clinicianreviews/picture

Answers to September “Picture This” (Clinician Reviews. 2017;27[9]:27): 1c, 2d, 3b, 4a


 

1. A 16-year-old boy presents with a skin ulcer on the dorsum of his hand and swollen glands in the proximal axilla. He works as a camp counselor in South Dakota, leading nature walks and teaching the children to care for animals, including the camp’s rabbits. Several weeks ago, he developed a fever of 103°F, fatigue, and body aches, followed by the appearance of the skin lesion.

1. A 16-year-old boy presents with a skin ulcer on the dorsum of his hand and swollen glands in the proximal axilla. He works as a camp counselor in South Dakota, leading nature walks and teaching the children to care for animals, including the camp’s rabbits. Several weeks ago, he developed a fever of 103°F, fatigue, and body aches, followed by the appearance of the skin lesion image Source: Science Source [Image Number BB8283]
 

Diagnosis: Tularemia—also called rabbit fever or deer fly fever—is caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis. It is an insect-borne pathogen of rabbits, squirrels, and other rodents, most commonly found in the western United States and Russia. Symptoms vary by mechanism of exposure but include skin ulcers; irritation and inflammation of the eye; sore throat, mouth ulcers, and tonsillitis; lung involvement with cough, chest pain, and difficulty breathing; and swelling of regional lymph nodes. Tularemia can be successfully treated with antibiotics.

For more information, see “Pneumonic Tularemia Presenting With a Vesicular Eruption.” Cutis. 2015;95(4):E17-E18.

   Comments ()

Recommended for You

More from Clinician Reviews

Quizzes from CLINICIAN-IQ

Research Summaries from ClinicalEdge

Related Articles

Next Article:

Scratching the Surface of the Problem